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AP Program

AP English Language and Composition
Number of Credits: 1.0

The AP English Language and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level rhetoric and writing curriculum which requires students to develop evidence-based analytic and argumentative essays that proceed through several stages and drafts. Students evaluate, synthesize, and cite research to support their arguments. Throughout the course, students develop a personal style by making appropriate grammatical choices. Additionally, students read and analyze the rhetorical elements and their effects in non-fiction text, including graphic images as forms of text, from many disciplines and historical periods.

AP English Literature and Composition
Number of Credits: 1.0

The AP English Literature and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level literary analysis course. The course engages students in the close reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature to deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style, and themes, as well as its use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. Writing assignments include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays that require students to analyze and interpret literary works.

AP Calculus AB
Number of Credits: 1.0

AP Calculus AB is roughly equivalent to a first semester college calculus course devoted to topics in differential and integral calculus. The AP course covers topics in the areas, including concepts and skills of limits, derivatives, definite integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. The course teaches students to approach calculus concepts and problems when they are represented graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally, and to make connections amongst these representations. Students learn how to use technology to help solve problems, experiment, interpret results, and support conclusions.

AP Statistics
Number of Credits: 1.0

Course content includes but is not limited to the following; exploratory data: observing patterns and departures from patterns; planning a study: deciding what and how to measure; anticipating patterns in advance: producing models, using probability and simulation, and statistical inference.

AP Biology
Number of Credits: 1.0

The purpose of this course is to provide a study of the facts, principles, and processes of biology and the collection, interpretation, and formulation of hypotheses from available data. Course content follows the outline set forth by the College Board.

AP Chemistry
Number of Credits: 1.0

The AP Chemistry course provides students with a foundation to support future advanced course work in chemistry. Through inquiry-based learning, students develop critical thinking and reasoning skills. Students cultivate their understanding of chemistry and science practice as they explore topics such as: atomic structure, intermolecular forces and bonding, chemical reactions, kinetics, thermodynamics, and equilibrium.

AP United States History
Number of Credits: 1.0

Students understand the development of the United States within the context of history by examining connections to the past to prepare for the future as participating members of a democratic society. Students use knowledge pertaining to history, geography, economics, political processes, religion, ethics, diverse cultures and humanities, to solve problems in academic, civic, social and employment settings.

AP Macroeconomics
Number of Credits: 1.0

The purpose of the AP course in macroeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the economic system. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets and includes the study of factor markets and of the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. The following is a brief discussion of these topics and some aspects of them that a teacher may choose to explore.

AP United States Government
Number of Credits: 1.0

Students acquire a critical perspective of politics and government in the United States. They learn general concepts used to interpret American politics and analyze specific case studies. Students also become familiar with the various institution, groups, beliefs and ideas that constitute the American political perspective.

AP World History
Number of Credits: 1.0

The purpose of the AP World History course is to develop greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts, in interaction with different types of human societies. This understanding is advanced through a combination of selective factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills. The course highlights the nature of changes in international frameworks and their causes and consequences, as well as comparisons among major societies. The course emphasizes relevant factual knowledge deployed in conjunction with leading interpretive issues and types of historical evidence. The course builds on an understanding of cultural, institutional, and technological precedents that, along with geography, set the human stage. Periodization, explicitly discussed, forms an organizing principle for dealing with change and continuity throughout the course. Specific themes provide further organization to the course, along with the consistent attention to contacts among societies that form the core of world history as a field of study.

AP Human Geography
Number of Credits: 1.0

The AP Human Geography course is equivalent to an introductory college-level course in human geography. The course introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine socioeconomic organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their research and applications. The curriculum reflects the goals of the National Geography Standards (2012).

AP Studio Art Two-Dimensional Design
Number of Credits: 1.0

The AP Program offers three studio art courses and portfolios: Two-Dimensional Design, Three-Dimensional Design, and Drawing. The AP Studio Art portfolios are designed for students who are seriously interested in the practical experience of art. Students submit portfolios for evaluation at the end of the school year. The AP Studio Art Program consists of three portfolios – 2-D Design, 3-D Design and Drawing – corresponding to the most common college foundation courses. Students may choose to submit any or all of the Drawing, Two-Dimensional Design, or Three-Dimensional design portfolios. AP Studio Art students create a portfolio work to demonstrate the artistic skills and ideas they have developed, refined, and applied over the course of the year to produce visual compositions.

AP Spanish Language and Culture
Number of Credits: 1.0

The AP Spanish Language and Culture Exam assesses students' proficencies in the interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes of communication. Exam questions assess all themes outlined in the course and exam description. As much as possible, students read and listen to authentic texts from the Spanish-speaking world throughout the exam.